Wood Furniture

Rundown What You Need
Before you consider the furniture itself, you need to ask yourself what hardware you truly need. You will require a PC, printer and telephones to work with. Along these lines, you will need to know what number of shelves, cupboards and work areas you have to accommodate those gadgets. Make sure you put a lot of energy into this rundown so that you are sure it has everything you need.

Choose Which Room You Will Use
Are you going to modify one room and use half of it for your work, or are you going to convert an entire room to your new home office? Whatever arrangement you have, ensure the place is free of clutter and is serene so you don’t get diverted from work.

Know How Much Space You Have
You certainly don’t need your new working area to look messy and jumbled because you’ve put every piece of furniture you could get your hands on in it. A clean and open room will help you to feel more organised and calm. Measure the room and make sure you know how much or how little space you have for your new furniture.

Pick Furniture According To Your Style
If you intend to be working in your new office for a long time and over several days, you should start off on the right foot and seek out furniture that is fulfilling and looks beautiful. You don’t want to be in a room full of ugly furniture all the time; that won’t help you be productive.

Choose pieces that match the style of the room and don’t have a jarring visual presence; Pick a chair that is ergonomic for your posture and comfortable to sit in for long periods; choose furniture that has lots of storage space so that you can always have a tidy space.

Antique Wood Furniture

Oil finishes have also been used for hundreds of years. These penetrating oils are easy for amateurs to use because they are simply wiped or brushed onto the wood, allowed to sink in, and wiped dry. This process is repeated many times, until the desired sheen is developed. A disadvantage is that the finish may gradually dry out, requiring repeated applications, sometimes for years to maintain an even sheen. While not particularly durable, if there is damage, it is simple to add more oil and it blends in nicely.

Natural shellac was a very popular finish for furniture and floors a century ago. It affords warm color, but has very poor wearability and is easily damaged by both water and alcohol. Shellacked floors were usually redone annually. Similarly, French polish is a very laborious traditional technique that is very bright and glossy, and dramatically emphasizes the rich color and grain of beautiful wood. Especially popular in Europe, this finish is very sensitive to damage, costly to apply originally and to repair.

True natural varnish is rarely used anymore. While durable and attractive, it required very skilled application, many slow-drying coats and lots of surface preparation.

Traditional lacquer finishes have been popular for 100 years – they have good stain resistance, wear well and can be re-touched or re-coated fairly easily. Hard and fairly brittle, they can chip and crack, and sometimes get crazed or crackled – “alligatored” – over time. Strong and dangerous solvents are used in classic lacquer.

Most newly manufactured furniture has a single coat of plastic-type finish, usually polyurethane or polyester. While very tough and resistant to scratching and stains, the single layer of tinted finish means that a small scratch or ding may go through the finish to the wood underneath, exposing a different color. These finishes are very difficult to touch up, re-coat or remove for refinishing. The great advantages of this technique are time and labor savings for manufacturers. Many of these finishes are quick-cured with ultra-violet light, and some are water rather than solvent based. An esthetic disadvantage is a rather “plastic” look and feel.

A recent method of protecting furniture is water based lacquer, developed and perfected over recent decades in response to environmental and worker safety issues. Combining both water and alcohol resistance, these finishes have a more traditional varnished look, not so “plastic-like.” They are not as hard and brittle as some other finishes, and can be more easily touched up and re-coated when worn or damaged. Much less hazardous to work with, they are a good middle ground in appearance, durability, and restorability. Much as water base paint has all but replaced oil paint, these water – borne wood finishes are gaining on solvent – based finish.

These new water-base methods can incorporate traditional techniques of applying a base coat of stain, topped with repeated coats of clear finish, hand-sanded between every coating. While involving more labor than most manufacturers are willing to do, this step-by-step finish insures that minor damage to the finish doesn’t go deep into the color or the wood, which means it shows less. Touch-up or repairs to the finish or recoating in the future are relatively simple. Environmental and worker safety issues suggest that water-base finishes have an expanding future.

As far as maintenance is concerned, wax finishes are best polished with a dry cloth or a little additional wax. For the other finishes that have a hard surface, a little lemon oil, preferably with beeswax, will brighten and deepen the color. Research has shown that too frequent use of lemon oil will soften hard finishes, but in moderation, this is a great polish.

Paste wax has been a traditional furniture polish. Besides requiring much elbow grease, wax will turn white from something hot or wet. Spray commercial polishes (Pledge, Endust and the like) can cause a smeary silicone build-up that can be very hard to remove. They also make any kind of touch-up or refinishing problematic. “Oil and stain” polishes like Old English are temporary scratch covers. A much better idea is to use the marker type of scratch covers that come in all shades of wood finishes and easily help hide minor mars. These are available at most paint and hardware stores. Following with a lemon oil and beeswax polish will improve any dry or worn finish.

Modern Coffee Tables

Another great style choice in modern coffee tables is the original Marcel Breuer style, with its silver metal legs and simple black top. His coffee table with attached nesting table design is especially noteworthy. Most famous as a designer of monuments, Breuer’s furniture styles are in great demand.

Consider, also, Curvet’s designs in modern coffee tables. His style offers a wide range of choices, including a large coffee table called the “Big Cheese” design that resembles a chunk of Swiss cheese, and a curved glass coffee table that is a true work of art.

For American modern coffee tables, consider the designs of Ray and Charles Eames. From wooden tables with wire bases to long elliptical tables, modern coffee tables that nod to the Eames style are a classic choice for modern homes.

Kenshoma also offers unique modern styles that include elements that are somewhat more traditional. Their sea star table includes teak legs and a wicker top, and is a modern coffee table that would also work well in a setting that is somewhat more traditional.

Exciting styles in modern coffee tables abound. Spend some time shopping around, and you’re sure to find a great modern coffee table that complements your home’s style beautifully.

Teak Garden Furniture

Durable and Strong

Teak has many advantages over other materials used to make patio furniture. The first and most significant advantage is that teak is a strong, durable and beautiful hardwood from India, Thailand or Malaysia. This exotic material was first used in the Middle Ages as a shipbuilding material, so it had to be strong to endure the long voyages at sea.

Waterproof

After the ships were decommissioned, the boats made with teak material were still salvageable, since teak did not rot or rust, even when joined with metal. This is one of the reasons that teak is such a great material used to make garden furniture. So, if teak could survive long trips on the harsh ocean, image how well it will stand up in your garden–without rusting or rotting! These waterproofing advantages are what make teak garden furniture an exceptional choice for your garden furniture.

Low Maintenance

Garden furniture can be extremely high maintenance. Some materials attract dirt and grime more than other materials however, not teak wood. Teak, on the other hand, is very low maintenance, making teak garden furniture a great buy. If you are looking for a low maintenance material for your garden furniture, teak wood is the way to go.

Info of Teak Wood

It is also easy to work with, and it is resistant to decay. The main advantage of teak for the building of ships is its unique ability to prevent rust and corrosion when in contact with metal. These qualities make it a valuable resource. Even today, teak wood is used in the construction of ships and expensive yachts and boats.

When the ships were no longer sea worthy the ships decking was in such good condition that the teak wood was recycled and made into outdoor furniture. It is possible that the first outdoor teak benches were made of old ship decks. Teak wood is so durable and strong that there are century old teak park benches in England still in use today.

The harvesting of teak wood is not an easy process. The logs are so heavy they will not float. Therefore, transporting the wood is not a particularly easy thing to do. In fact, elephants pull the logs through the jungle regions, just as they did a century ago. The elephants must pull the logs a long way through the jungles to the waterways. The trained elephants stack the logs in piles.

Teak wood was admired for its beauty back in the 1800s in India. It was able to capture the romantic nature of the Victorian era making it a perfect complement to an English garden. The durable and versatile nature of teak wood make it well sought after throughout the world.

Teak is grown today throughout Central America, parts of South America and Asia. Teak wood today is used for indoor wood flooring and other general construction. Teak is popular for durable and beautiful outdoor patio furniture. Its high oil content makes it ideal for outdoor furniture. Teak wood patio furniture is favored among high-end ski resorts. For construction projects requiring durability and elegance, teak wood is the wood of choice.

Beds For Toddler

Toddler beds come in wide varieties and enchanting styles. They bring together both quality and fun and will urge any toddler want to go to bed. Imagine your child jumping into a bed that is shaped like a toy train with bells and whistles and storage space for books and toys. Little boys love beds shaped like cars, trucks and motorcycles. Any one of these would make your little man want to give up his crib.

Things To Look For Before Buying A Bed For Toddlers

Accessibility: Toddlers should be easily accessible. The toddler should be able to get in and out of beds without problems. One must avoid beds which are too high.

Color and design: Beds for toddlers come in number of colors and designs. Match a toddlers bed to the color and decor of the toddlers room.

Wooden bed: Wooden beds for toddler can fit into any nursery decor. The are durable and great for the toddler.

Buy Leather Bar Stools

The biggest thing you should be looking for while shopping for leather bar stools is the details. Paying attention to what little things make a bar stool expensive as to the cheap versions. You can actually get a nice, leather bar stool for the same price as a generic looking stool if you pay attention to the details. Just do some simple research to see the differences between your local brands and the national brands. Figure out what you want and what you expect to get.

Look for sales! This is about the best advice you can receive when it comes to shopping for anything- especially leather bar stools! You can look for sales locally or better yet you can check out the internet to see which retail stores are doing closeout sales on their furniture. It is usually best to stick to a retailer with a reputable name when it comes to leather products though because it is easy to get ripped off by paying for real leather and receiving generic. Don’t let this happen to you. Leather bar stools do go on sale occasionally in nearly every store so look around, search out the best deals.

Pick the Right Mattress

When choosing the right mattress for yourself or your family, you’ll need to consider the following points:
• Health-needs
• Budget
• Material Type
• Firmness

The first step in choosing the right mattress is to do some research into your own sleep needs. According to Spine-Health, you may spend more than one-quarter of your life in your bed – shouldn’t the bed be suited to your specific needs? A mattress is an investment in your health. According to the Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School, insufficient sleep can put you at a greater risk for diseases and other health problems.

Any spine or other health-related issues should be factored into your mattress decision. Before you begin your search, speak with your doctor and ask for their advice on which mattress will provide the support your body needs.

Just because a mattress is an investment in your health, it doesn’t mean you have to spend a fortune. Mattress prices will range due to size, brand and material type; however, you can still find an affordable option that meets the budget you set.

From traditional spring coils to adjustable models, there are plenty of mattress options to choose from. The most important feature though is firmness. Different sleep positions require different levels of firmness for optimal comfort. Is the mattress firm? That’s the ideal choice for stomach and back sleepers. If you’re a side sleeper, a soft mattress will ensure the best sleep. Consider your weight when selecting firmness. The level of firmness should be increased with the weight of the sleeper to adjust for potential sinkage.

A mattress is a purchase that you’ll use each night and it’s important that you select the option that maximizes your comfort. If you know your health needs, stick to a budget and understand whether you want your mattress soft or firm, choosing the right mattress will be nothing to lose sleep over.

Patio Furniture

Now, let’s take a look at a short list, not claiming to be exhaustive, of patio and garden furniture terms you may not understand.

  • Adirondack chair – A type of chair used primarily outdoors.
  • Arbor – A shaded sitting place in your garden.
  • Bird bath – A shallow basin filled with water for bathing, used as an attraction for birds.
  • Chaise longue – An upholstered couch in the shape of a chair.
  • Fountain – An arrangement where water issues from a source, fills a basin, and is drained away.
  • Grill – A charcoal or gas-fueled device used for cooking food.
  • Hammock – A network of thin rope, streched between 2 points, used to sleep or rest in.
  • Parasol – An umbrella made for protection against rain or sun.
  • Porch swing – A hanging seat, usually found on a porch for relaxing.
  • Sundial – A device that measures time by the position of the Sun.
  • Torch – A portable source of fire, used as a source of light.
  • Trellis – A structure that supports many types of climbing plants.
  • Umbrella – A collapsible canopy that protects from sun or rain.
  • Weather vane – A movable device attached to the roof a house for showing the direction of the wind.
  • Wind chime – Hollow or solid metal tubes, which hung outside and are played by the wind, producing pleasant sounds.

Dovetails

For thousands of years, a dovetail joint was created by a skilled cabinetmaker using small, precision saws and wood chisels. Tiny angled saw cuts were followed by careful cutting by a sharpened chisel on both sides to avoid splintering. One board had tiny “tails,” and the other had the larger “pins,” carefully measured to match and fit together exactly. When the joint is expertly executed, it is a thing of beauty, and a secure joining of two boards that can last for centuries. A little glue cements the connection, and a good dovetail joint has great strength and durability.

Hand cut dovetails were used to hold the sides of drawers together, but also to join the structural members of case furniture. Hand made screws and nails were relatively expensive and could rust and expand, sometimes cracking the wood they secured. Glues of the period sometimes weakened. Dovetails have great strength, holding pieces of wood in perfect alignment over long periods of time. Simpler country furniture often had larger dovetails, or even a single tail and pin.

Genuine hand-made dovetails like these were the standard of good furniture craftsmanship until about 1870, when American ingenuity developed the “pin and cove” or round style dovetail, often seen on late Victorian and Eastlake furniture. These were cut with a jig or pattern, and an apprentice could create a very well fitting and attractive joint. Popular here into the 1890’s, these joints never gained acceptance outside of the U.S. and Canada. European cabinetmakers continued their hand-cut dovetails well into the 1900’s.

The next technological development in joinery was again American. In the 1890’s, American furniture began to be mass produced, with interchangeable parts and speedy production for the growing and affluent middle class. The slow and laborious crafting and carving, one piece at a time, by a master woodworker was not suited to the new mass market. Steam power, transferred by pulleys and leather belts, operated saws, carving machines and routers that could copy an original pattern exactly.

These routers were ancestors of the electric precision tools of today, and could be used to rapidly cut a machined dovetail joint. Each cut is exactly like the others, each “tail” and “pin” are exactly matched. A close inspection shows no irregular saw cuts or variation from a skilled craftsman, but rather a precise and identical manufactured machined joint. These machine-cut dovetails are as strong and long lasting as the hand-made joints, and became the standard of better American furniture ever since the late 1890’s. Other drawer joints include sliding keyhole or French dovetails that were have been used since the 1890’s.